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UNICEF in Horn of Africa - News from the Field

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UNICEF in the Field in Horn of Africa

July 19, 2011

UNICEF Executive Director meets villagers in drought-stricken Kenya

Across the Horn of Africa, millions of people are suffering the consequences of what is called the worst drought in 50 years. See how UNICEF is helping.

July 19, 2011

Somali refugee waits for her life to begin again in Dadaab, Kenya

The Ifo, Hagadera and Dagahaley refugee camps in Dadaab, north-eastern Kenya, are overflowing with refugees from drought and conflict in neighboring Somalia. UNICEF Kenya’s Edita Nsubuga recounts the story of one adolescent refugee caught in the crisis that has afflicted the entire region.

July 17, 2011

Situation in Horn of Africa set to get worse for millions of children

UNICEF has called for an immediate expansion of assistance across the Horn of Africa’s drought affected communities, to address the dire needs of more than two million children, of whom half a million are at imminent risk of dying. With no improvement in the overall food security conditions expected before early 2012 the already severe nutrition situation will likely worsen further.

July 14, 2011

As impact of drought in Horn of Africa worsens, UNICEF scales up humanitarian response

UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake is in Nairobi to strengthen the concerted response by UN agencies and partners to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa. UNICEF has appealed for $31.8 million to rapidly ramp-up the response aimed especially at children, who are suffering the brunt of the crisis. UNICEF says the most urgent needs include therapeutic feeding, vitamin supplementation, water and sanitation services, child protection measures and immunization.

July 14, 2011

UNICEF airlifts emergency supplies to southern Somalia in response to worsening child malnutrition

The most severe humanitarian emergency in the world has been declared in the Horn of Africa, with Somalia being the epicenter of the crisis. More than half a million children in Somalia are acutely malnourished and in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. UNICEF airlifted emergency nutrition supplies and water-related equipment to Baidoa in southern Somalia, as part of its lifesaving interventions to assist drought-affected children in Somalia.

July 13, 2011

Somali refugees crowd camps in Kenya amid record-setting drought

Hundreds of thousands of refugees are overwhelming camps in Dadaab, Kenya, where they are seeking a haven from drought and conflict in neighboring Somalia.The refugees arrive mainly on foot, exhausted and dehydrated from a journey that can take up to two months. UNICEF's work in the refugee camps focuses on identifying unaccompanied minors, ensuring that children and mothers have enough to eat and providing safe spaces for children.

July 12, 2011

Two million children at risk of starvation in Horn of Africa

More than two million young children are malnourished in drought-affected Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia, and Djibouti, half a million of whom require immediate lifesaving attention to survive. The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is raising funds to prevent child deaths from malnutrition and disease in these countries. UNICEF is one of the largest suppliers of Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods, which provide life-saving nutrients to sustain and feed severely malnourished children.

June 29, 2011

UNICEF concerned about impact of drought on children in the Horn of Africa

With a major food and refugee crisis looming in the Horn of Africa due to a deadly combination of drought, on-going conflict and escalating food prices, UNICEF calls on local governments and donors to lead a rapid humanitarian response. Millions of children and women are at risk from death and disease unless a rapid and speedy response is put into action.

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FAMINE IN SOMALIA

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Thousands of families flee famine in Somalia.

Learn more, view photos from the ground.

See an infographic of UNICEF's work in Somalia.

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