Next Gen to help fund Pakistan health workers

April 19, 2011

By

social@unicefusa.org

Suruchi Ahuja is a UNICEF Next Generation Steering Committee member.

UNICEF's Next Generation is excited to support the Community and Lady Health Workers program. Every year, almost 460,000 Pakistani children under the age of 5 die from preventable causes and nearly one in ten will not see their fifth birthday. Pneumonia and diarrhea are the main killers of young children and their low status in society can leave them at risk to daily violence at home and in school, and at risk of organized trafficking and sexual exploitation. Girls are particularly vulnerable as conservative attitudes often prevent them attending or finishing school.

Suruchi Ahuja is a UNICEF Next Generation Steering Committee member.

UNICEF's Next Generation is excited to support the Community and Lady Health Workers program. Every year, almost 460,000 Pakistani children under the age of 5 die from preventable causes and nearly one in ten will not see their fifth birthday. Pneumonia and diarrhea are the main killers of young children and their low status in society can leave them at risk to daily violence at home and in school, and at risk of organized trafficking and sexual exploitation. Girls are particularly vulnerable as conservative attitudes often prevent them attending or finishing school.

Suruchi Ahuja is a UNICEF Next Generation Steering Committee member.

UNICEF's Next Generation is excited to support the Community and Lady Health Workers program.

Every year, almost 460,000 Pakistani children under the age of 5 die from preventable causes, and nearly 1 in 10 will not see their fifth birthday. Meanwhile, children's low status in society can leave them at risk to daily violence at home and in school, and at risk of organized trafficking and sexual exploitation. Girls are particularly vulnerable as conservative attitudes often prevent them attending or finishing school.

 

A Lady Health Worker (LHW) giving Vitamin A to a young girl child in her Health House. Sialkot City. Punjab Province, Pakistan.
UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani
A Lady Health Worker (LHW) giving Vitamin A to a young girl child in her Health House. Sialkot City. Punjab Province, Pakistan.

 

This situation existed in Pakistan prior to the flooding that devastated the nation in 2010. Last year, more than 20 million people, 1 in 8 Pakistanis, were impacted: over 10 million children, 28% of them under 5 years old, and 3 million women were severely affected and tens of thousands are still in relief camps and spontaneous settlements. This has only exacerbated the existing challenges the children of Pakistan face.

To help overcome these challenges, UNICEF's Next Generation has chosen the Pakistani Community and Lady Health Worker Program as its next initiative. The program trains Pakistani women with the knowledge and skills necessary to inform families about the health and nutrition interventions that are available for their children. The program creates community awareness about key health issues such as the critical importance of seeking health care at the appropriate time, appropriate prenatal care, vaccinations and overall health and sanitary considerations.

Simultaneously, by providing participating Pakistani women with a salary and training, the program also addresses the financial and social pressures Pakistani women are facing due to the loss of economic resources caused by the floodwaters, as well as the conservative attitudes in society.

The Pakistani Community and Lady Health Workers program is an innovative and sustainable solution. Next Generation strongly believes that with the funds we raise we will not only be able to strengthen, but also expand the program to help more children, families and communities in Pakistan's affected regions.

Join the Discussion

  • 0 Comments