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#StandWithMalala

Believe in ZERO Girls Denied an Education

Malala Yousufzai

16-year old Malala Yousafzai from Swat, Pakistan

We continue to applaud the incredible spirit and inspiring courage of Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old girl from Swat, Pakistan, who was shot along with two other children as she was leaving school by bus in 2012.

Now living in the U.K., Malala is back in the classroom and speaking out on behalf of the 57 million children around the world who are not enrolled in school.

Malala has been a tireless advocate for the right of all Pakistani girls to receive an education.

Her courageous voice speaks for millions of girls who are desperate to go to school.

Act Now

At the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, we believe ZERO girls should be denied an education.  If you do too, join us:

  1. Explore and share the links on the right to educate yourself and others about the issue.
  2. Consider making a donation to support UNICEF's education programs in Pakistan. 

Know the Facts

Globally, an estimated 57 million primary school-age children are not in school. In many parts of the world, girls are less likely to enroll than boys. In some areas of Pakistan, only one out of every five children in schools is a girl.

Some girls live in areas where there are no schools, or the enrollment fees are cost-prohibitive. In some cases, when parents can only afford to send one child to school, sons are favored over daughters. In other cases, girls are routinely discriminated against—denied an education due to their gender.

UNICEF’s mandate to serve the most marginalized populations focuses special attention on girls. Its interventions typically include outreach to identify excluded and at-risk girls and get them into school, support for governments and communities to improve access for those children who are hardest to reach or suffer most from discrimination, and programs to eliminate cultural, social and economic barriers to girls’ education.

Stand with Malala:
Learn About the Issues