UNICEF Haiti bracing for tropical storm Emily

August 4, 2011
The tropical storm watch for Haiti has been upgraded to a tropical storm warning. Tropical Storm Emily is reportedly moving at 70 km/h in a westward direction across the Caribbean Sea and is expected to reach Port-au-Prince in the early morning of Thursday, 4 August (late Wednesday night).
The tropical storm watch for Haiti has been upgraded to a tropical storm warning. Tropical Storm Emily is reportedly moving at 70 km/h in a westward direction across the Caribbean Sea and is expected to reach Port-au-Prince in the early morning of Thursday, 4 August (late Wednesday night).

A tropical storm warning is in effect for Haiti. Tropical Storm Emily is reportedly moving at 70 km/h in a westward direction across the Caribbean Sea and is expected to reach Port-au-Prince late Wednesday night.

Forecasts suggest that the storm could produce total rain accumulations of up to 10 inches, meaning that flash floods and landslides are very likely. Flooding in Haiti has resulted in the destruction of temporary shelters, population displacement in the past - and always carries with it a higher-risk of waterborne disease, including an accelerated transmission of cholera.

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UNICEF/NYHQ2010-2699/Roger LeMoyne
Hundreds of thousands of Haitians are still living in temporary homes that are vulnerable to storms and flooding.

In preparation, UNICEF Haiti has prepositioned emergency supplies in critical points throughout the country and deployed teams and transport trucks to north and south areas of the country to ensure a response in the event of limited access due to flooded transportation networks.

UNICEF's preparations are part of Haitian contingency plans to meet the emergency needs of as many as 300,000 persons. Concern centers on the risks that flooding and high winds pose residents of IDP camps and low-lying areas. The storm comes as Haiti continues to recover from the January 2010 earthquake and cholera outbreak that has claimed more than 5,500 lives and hospitalized hundreds of thousands.