Typhoon Koppu Hits the Philippines

October 19, 2015

The storm made landfall Sunday with torrential rain and flooding. UNICEF has readied tents, generators and water purification tablets.

A mother and her daughter evacuate the town of Laur, Nueva Ecija, just one area flooded by Typhoon Koppu. UNICEF estimates that at least 36,000 children need help. ©UNICEF PHILIPPINES/2015/JEOFFREY MAITEM

Some 100,000 Filipinos have been displaced by tropical storm Koppu, which meteorologists predict will remain life-threatening for days to come. Known locally as "Lando," Koppu made landfall as a typhoon, causing severe floods and landslides that have knocked out power and communication lines and damaged roads and bridges. At least 12 people have died.

"UNICEF's first priority is to ensure children are safe and protected."—Lotta Sylwander, UNICEF Philippines

Koppu has pounded mountainous and hard-to-reach areas, and rising floodwaters have blocked efforts to bring food and water to residents.  “We are concerned about the well-being of all affected children,” says UNICEF Philippines representative Lotta Sylwander. "UNICEF’s first priority is to ensure children are safe and protected."

Readying Relief for Children in Advance of Typhoon Koppu

UNICEF began preparing supplies last week in advance of the storm—the Philippines’ twelfth tropical cyclone this year. Medicines, therapeutic food, tents and generators, water purification tablets, hygiene kits and school supplies for 12,000 families are at the ready.

Reports from affected areas are limited, but UNICEF is poised to act as soon as the Filipino government determines what assistance it needs. We will keep you updated. Please support UNICEF’s emergency relief efforts for children.

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Daniel Upandez, 8, in the typhoon hit city of Palayan, Nueva Ecija Province. In any event of disasters, children are among the most vulnerable.

Daniel Upandez, 8, amid wreckage in Nueva Ecija Province, one of the areas hardest hit by Typhoon Koppu. ©UNICEF PHILIPPINES/2015/JEOFFREY MAITEM