NBC's Today: A day for Sprinkles

March 18, 2010

Jenna Bush Hager, longtime UNICEF supporter and a correspondent for NBC's Today show, reported last week on a story that may have been news for some morning audiences but is a core concern for us at the U.S. Fund. The segment was shot in Guatemala, the country with the highest rates of malnutrition in Latin America.

Bush told the story of Maria Claudia Sentizo, an officer from UNICEF Guatemala, and of her "daily rescue mission" to bring UNICEF-supplied micronutrient supplements to children who have been the hardest hit victims of rising food prices and food scarcity.

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This child nutrition crisis is more than a news story for Bush, who began her job with the Today show in September 2009. The former first daughter has been involved with children's issues in Latin America since 2007, when she interned for UNICEF. She is currently chairing UNICEF's Next Generation, a group of young professionals committed to UNICEF's mission.

Malnutrition is a major contributor to child mortality. In less critical cases, it can still cause arrested cognitive development and poor academic performance. In Guatemala, it can be seen as perpetuating a cycle of poverty, illiteracy and unemployment.

But it's impact on children is more immediately visible. "The first thing they lose is their smile," says Sentizo.

With your help, UNICEF can restore smiles, along with critical vitamins and minerals. Sprinkles - doing whatever it takes.

Jenna Bush Hager, longtime UNICEF supporter and a correspondent for NBC's Today show, reported last week on a story that may have been news for some morning audiences but is a core concern for us at the U.S. Fund. The segment was shot in Guatemala, the country with the highest rates of malnutrition in Latin America.

Bush told the story of Maria Claudia Sentizo, an officer from UNICEF Guatemala, and of her "daily rescue mission" to bring UNICEF-supplied micronutrient supplements to children who have been the hardest hit victims of rising food prices and food scarcity.

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

This child nutrition crisis is more than a news story for Bush, who began her job with the Today show in September 2009. The former first daughter has been involved with children's issues in Latin America since 2007, when she interned for UNICEF. She is currently chairing UNICEF's Next Generation, a group of young professionals committed to UNICEF's mission.

Malnutrition is a major contributor to child mortality. In less critical cases, it can still cause arrested cognitive development and poor academic performance. In Guatemala, it can be seen as perpetuating a cycle of poverty, illiteracy and unemployment.

But it's impact on children is more immediately visible. "The first thing they lose is their smile," says Sentizo.

With your help, UNICEF can restore smiles, along with critical vitamins and minerals. Sprinkles - doing whatever it takes.

Jenna Bush Hager, longtime UNICEF supporter and a correspondent for NBC's Today show, reported last week on a story that may have been news for some morning audiences but is a core concern for us at the U.S. Fund. The segment was shot in Guatemala, the country with the highest rates of malnutrition in Latin America.

Bush told the story of Maria Claudia Sentizo, an officer from UNICEF Guatemala, and of her "daily rescue mission" to bring UNICEF-supplied micronutrient supplements called "sprinkles" to children who have been the hardest hit victims of rising food prices and food scarcity.

This child nutrition crisis is more than a news story for Bush, who began her job with the Today Show in September 2009. The former first daughter has been involved with children's issues in Latin America since 2007, when she interned for UNICEF. She is currently chairing UNICEF's Next Generation, a group of young professionals committed to UNICEF's mission.

Malnutrition is a major contributor to child mortality. In less critical cases, it can still cause arrested cognitive development and poor academic performance. In Guatemala, it can be seen as perpetuating a cycle of poverty, illiteracy and unemployment.

But it's impact on children is more immediately visible. "The first thing they lose is their smile," says Sentizo.

With your help, UNICEF can restore smiles, along with critical vitamins and minerals. Sprinkles