UNICEF Nigeria welcomes release of over 180 children suspected of Boko Haram ties from administrative custody

July 10, 2018

  

ABUJA, (July 9, 2018) – UNICEF welcomes today the release of 183 children from Nigerian Armed Forces, in Maiduguri, Borno State, northeast Nigeria. The release comes after the children, aged 7-18, were cleared of ties with Boko Haram insurgents.

“These 8 girls and 175 boys are first and foremost victims of the ongoing conflict and their release is an important step on their long road to recovery,” said Mohamed Fall, UNICEF Representative in Nigeria. “We will be working with the Borno State Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development and partners to provide the children with all the assistance they need. I also want to commend the action taken by the military and the authorities, it demonstrates a clear commitment to better protect children affected by the conflict.” 

After having been held in administrative custody, the children will receive medical attention and psychosocial support before the process of reuniting them with their families and reintegrating them into society begins.

Since 2017, UNICEF has supported the social and economic reintegration of more than 8,700 children released from armed groups, helping trace their families, returning them to their communities, offering them psychosocial support, education, vocational training and informal apprenticeships, as well as opportunities to improve livelihoods.

 

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About UNICEF USA
The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) works in more than 190 countries and territories to put children first. UNICEF has helped save more children’s lives than any other humanitarian organization, by providing health care and immunizations, safe water and sanitation, nutrition, education, emergency relief and more. UNICEF USA supports UNICEF's work through fundraising, advocacy and education in the United States. Together, we are working toward the day when no children die from preventable causes and every child has a safe and healthy childhood. For more information, visit www.unicefusa.org

 

For more information, please contact:
Erica Vogel, UNICEF USA, evogel@unicefusa.org, 212.922.2480