Health Care is a Right | UNICEF USA
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Every day, UNICEF workers brave war zones, treacherous terrain, disasters and disease to make the world safe for kids. UNICEF has helped save more children's lives than any other humanitarian organizationUNICEF has helped save more children's lives than any other humanitarian organization

Kids need UNICEF now more than ever:

  • Vulnerable women and children are suffering the most from COVID-19's disruption of essential health services
  • By 2022, an additional 9.3 million children under 5 could suffer from wasting due to the COVID-19 pandemic's socio-economic impact 
  • Two in five schools around the world lack basic handwashing facilities, soap and water
  • Emergencies and disease outbreaks take a heavy toll on children. Last year, UNICEF responded to 211 health emergencies, including Ebola, cholera, Zika and measles
  • An estimated 200,000 additional stillbirths could occur this year because the pandemic kept pregnant women from seeking out health services
  • COVID-19 health-service disruptions in 68 countries could keep 80 million children under the age of one from getting their routine vaccinations
  • Each day, 880 children became infected with HIV, and 310 die of AIDS-related causes. Almost 1 million children and adolescents who have HIV who are not getting treatment

"To be a midwife, doctor or trainer, means to reduce the number of deaths and benefit society, especially since the Yemeni society has a high illiteracy rate.” Meet Amani Ahmed Mohammed Al-Shami, one of the dedicated health care workers committed to bringing down Yemen’s tragically high infant mortality rate. A trainer at a UNICEF-supported program in Dhamar, Yemen, Amani Ahmed teaches nurses, doctors' assistants and other health care workers how to prepare mothers for safe childbirth and those critical first days of their baby's life.

“To be a midwife, doctor or trainer, means to reduce the number of deaths and benefit society, especially since the Yemeni society has a high illiteracy rate.” Meet Amani Ahmed Mohammed Al-Shami, one of the dedicated health care workers committed to bringing down Yemen’s tragically high infant mortality rate.

 

Why donate to UNICEF? It's a smart way to make your money go further for children:UNICEF makes your online donations go further for children

  • UNICEF is a leader: UNICEF is leveraging its expertise as the world’s largest vaccine buyer— last year procuring 1.9 billion doses of vaccines for children in 102 countries — to ensure delivery of COVID-19 vaccines in low- and lower-middle-income countries
  • UNICEF has perfected low-cost solutions that work: UNICEF provided nearly 17.5 million people with bed nets to save children from deadly mosquito-borne diseases last year
  • UNICEF is an innovator: The U-Report COVID-19 bot answered users’ questions and tackled misinformation via SMS and messaging services like WhatsApp in 68 countries
  • UNICEF tackles tough problems: Too many pneumonia cases go untreated or are misdiagnosed because families can’t get adequate, affordable care. Last year, UNICEF ensured that 8.6 million children with suspected pneumonia received appropriate antibiotics
  • UNICEF works to stop outbreaks before they happen: 17 million children impacted by emergencies got their measles vaccine
  • UNICEF believes no child should die from something we can prevent: 66.3 million children received their DTP3/penta vaccines last year, protecting them from five life-threatening diseases — Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Hepatitis B and Hib
  • UNICEF is a mother’s best friend: 30.5 million babies were delivered in UNICEF-supported health-care facilities last year
  • Leveraging its expertise as the world’s largest vaccine buyer— last year procuring 1.9 billion doses of vaccines for children in 102 countries — UNICEF is helping to deliver over 1.4 billion COVID-19 vaccines in low- and lower-middle-income countries
  • 17.5 million people received insecticide-treated bed nets from UNICEF to protect children from deadly mosquito-borne diseases
  • The U-Report COVID-19 bot answered users' questions and tackled misinformation via SMS and other messaging services in 68 countries
  • 8.6 million children with suspected pneumonia received antibiotics
  • 17 million children in humanitarian emergencies got their measles vaccinations last year, thanks to UNICEF

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Meet the UNICEF workers helping kids around the world

We won't stop until we bring good health to every child
We won't stop until every child has clean water
We won't stop until we help every child learn
We won't stop until we reach every child in crisis
We won't stop until we treat every malnourished child
We won't stop until we protect every child
We won't stop until every child has a voice

UNICEF: saving and changing lives

Seventeen-year-old Ibrahim's life changed forever the day he stepped on a landmine in Yemen, where over 10,000 children have been killed or maimed since the start of the nation’s six-year war. He feared he'd never be able to walk, but a UNICEF-supported prosthetic center restored his hope and ability to get around on his own once again.

* Ibrahim, 17, stepped on a landmine while he was tending sheep in Yemen, where over 10,000 children have been killed or maimed since the start of the nation’s six-year war. Surgery at a hospital saved what remained of his legs, but left him unable to walk. But thanks to a UNICEF-supported prosthetic center, Ibrahim's hope and his ability to get around on his own are restored.