UNICEF and American Airlines, providing a future for kids in Honduras

April 8, 2009

By

afifield

At first glance, Ana Bessy Zelaya looks like a typical teenager. She wears blue jeans and sneakers, and her hair is tied back with a barrette. She's quiet and occasionally flashes a quick, shy smile. But her eyes carry a weariness that exceeds her 18 years.

Ana is the single mother of two young boys, Daniel, age five, and baby Julio. She supports the boys by selling clothes in a clamorous market in Honduras''' capital city, Tegucigalpa. But the money is modest. And Ana used to worry how she would provide her sons with basic things: food, medicine, school. "Now," she says. "I don't worry."



Thanks to an inventive, UNICEF-supported program, Ana's oldest son, Daniel, gets food, health care, and an education

At first glance, Ana Bessy Zelaya looks like a typical teenager. She wears blue jeans and sneakers, and her hair is tied back with a barrette. She's quiet and occasionally flashes a quick, shy smile. But her eyes carry a weariness that exceeds her 18 years.

Ana is the single mother of two young boys, Daniel, age five, and baby Julio. She supports the boys by selling clothes in a clamorous market in Honduras''' capital city, Tegucigalpa. But the money is modest. And Ana used to worry how she would provide her sons with basic things: food, medicine, school. Now,