Breakfast in Guatemala: Huevos and heros

February 17, 2010

By

crotter@unicefusa.org

I woke up to the most amazing and inspirational breakfast I have ever experienced (the food wasn't bad either ;). But I am referring to the company! Ten members of the Guatemalan Parliament of Childhood and Adolescence joined us for huevos, frijoles y platanos. Aged 11-19, they are all elected by their indigenous communities to be the voice of their peers. We broke the ice with a song and dance game called "cuchiera y paleta". Tak tak!

This group speaks to the public and the government about issues that are affecting children in Guatemala (sexual abuse, HIV/AIDs, migration, violence, gangs, malnutrition). They also educate their peers on their rights and work with them to identify and speak out about their problems.They are the future leaders of Guatemala.

 

Next Gener Danielle Abrham with two members of the student government Mayra and Evelyn.
© U.S. Fund for UNICEF/2010
Next Gener Danielle Abrham with two members of the student government Mayra and Evelyn.

 

Eleven-year old Jaclyn told us, "Guatemalan children are like corn seeds"you plant them and then need to take care of them, and if you do they will grow and prosper and feed the country."

We asked them about obstacles to their work. They said, "We must be like coconut trees. When we encounter barriers we must bend, never break."

These kids speak to judges, visit juvenile jails, and they even have a child rights radio show and tv show. They are some of the most amazing people I have ever met. Guatemala's future is in good hands.

Now we are at a Unicef-funded school in Totonicapan for students in kindergarten through sixth grade. UNICEF provides the funding for the three teachers, as well as for training, micro library and school supplies.

We were given a tour by five girls who are part of the school's government, acting as teacher's assistants and representatives of the student body. The second graders sang us a welcome song. I asked if they liked their school and 20 students yelled an enthusiastic "Siiiiii."

The president of the student body, Sindy, presented us with a letter that informed us of what they need. "First, we would like another teacher. Then, a new playing area or at leastsome ground for it. And a better kitchen to prepare the food."

They thanked us for coming saying, "because of UNICEF, we have good teachers, notebooks and books. Thank you!"

I woke up to the most amazing and inspirational breakfast I have ever experienced (the food wasn't bad either ;). But I am referring to the company! Ten members of the Guatemalan Parliament of Childhood and Adolescence joined us for huevos, frijoles y platanos. Aged 11-19, they are all elected by their indigenous communities to be the voice of their peers. We broke the ice with a song and dance game called "cuchiera y paleta". Tak tak!

This group speaks to the public and the government about issues that are affecting children in Guatemala (sexual abuse, HIV/AIDs, migration, violence, gangs, malnutrition). They also educate their peers on their rights and work with them to identify and speak out about their problems.They are the future leaders of Guatemala.

 

Next Gener Danielle Abrham with two members of the student government Mayra and Evelyn.
© U.S. Fund for UNICEF/2010
Next Gener Danielle Abrham with two members of the student government Mayra and Evelyn.

 

Eleven-year old Jaclyn told us, "Guatemalan children are like corn seeds"you plant them and then need to take care of them, and if you do they will grow and prosper and feed the country."

We asked them about obstacles to their work. They said, "We must be like coconut trees. When we encounter barriers we must bend, never break."

These kids speak to judges, visit juvenile jails, and they even have a child rights radio show and tv show. They are some of the most amazing people I have ever met. Guatemala's future is in good hands.

Now we are at a Unicef-funded school in Totonicapan for students in kindergarten through sixth grade. UNICEF provides the funding for the three teachers, as well as for training, micro library and school supplies.

We were given a tour by five girls who are part of the school's government, acting as teacher's assistants and representatives of the student body. The second graders sang us a welcome song. I asked if they liked their school and 20 students yelled an enthusiastic "Siiiiii."

The president of the student body, Sindy, presented us with a letter that informed us of what they need. "First, we would like another teacher. Then, a new playing area or at leastsome ground for it. And a better kitchen to prepare the food."

They thanked us for coming saying, "because of UNICEF, we have good teachers, notebooks and books. Thank you!"

I woke up to the most amazing and inspirational breakfast I have ever experienced (the food wasn't bad either ;). But I am referring to the company! Ten members of the Guatemalan Parliament of Childhood and Adolescence joined us for huevos, frijoles y platanos. Aged 11-19, they are all elected by their indigenous communities to be the voice of their peers. We broke the ice with a song and dance game called "cuchiera y paleta." Tak tak!

This group speaks to the public and the government about issues that are affecting children in Guatemala, like sexual abuse, HIV/AIDs, migration, violence, gangs, and malnutrition. They also educate their peers on their rights as children and work with them to identify and speak out about their problems.They are the future leaders of Guatemala.

Eleven-year old Jaclyn told us, "Guatemalan children are like corn kernels"you plant them and then need to take care of them, and if you do they will grow and prosper and feed the country."

We asked them about obstacles to their work. They said, "We must be like coconut trees. When we encounter barriers we must bend, never break."

These kids speak to judges, visit juvenile jails, and they even have a child rights radio show and tv show. They are some of the most amazing people I have ever met. Guatemala's future is in good hands.

 

Next Gener Danielle Abraham with two members of the student government, Mayra and Evelyn.
© U.S. Fund for UNICEF/2010
Next Gener Danielle Abraham with two members of the student government, Mayra and Evelyn.

 

Now we are at a UNICEF-funded school in Totonicapan for students in kindergarten through sixth grade. UNICEF provides the funding for the three teachers, as well as for training, micro library and school supplies.

We were given a tour by five girls who are part of the school's government, acting as teacher's assistants and representatives of the student body. The second graders sang us a welcome song. I asked if they liked their school and 20 students yelled an enthusiastic "Siiiiii."

The president of the student body, Sindy, presented us with a letter that informed us of what they need. "First, we would like another teacher. Then, a new playing area or at leastsome ground for it. And a better kitchen to prepare the food."

They thanked us for coming saying, "because of UNICEF, we have good teachers, notebooks and books. Thank you!"

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