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Slideshow: Ending Measles in Mongolia

UNICEF is a leader in the Measles & Rubella Initiative, a global partnership that has helped reduce measles deaths by 71 percent since 2000. A 2012 immunization campaign against measles and rubella in Mongolia extended into the country's most remote areas and immunized over 95 percent of the targeted children.

 

The Mongolian government led the UNICEF-supported campaign, which vaccinated more than 500,000 children aged 3 to 14. Mongolia's nomadic ways of life are changing. Ulan Bator, the capital, is home to almost half the population. A girl winces while being vaccinated for measles in an Ulan Bator school. A child in Mongolia raises his small finger, which is marked to indicate he has just been vaccinated for measles. Measles and rubella vaccinators travel by reindeer to reach children of nomadic herder families in Mongolia. To reach this 4-year old girl, a team traveled by jeep, reindeer, rope-drawn ferry, and on foot. A health worker prepares to administer the measles and rubella vaccine. A vaccinator in a remote area of Khövsgöl. Twenty-month-old M. Sarangoo smiles at her mother inside the local clinic in the northern Khövsgöl. Twenty-month-old M. Sarangoo sits on the lap of her father in their home in Khövsgöl. A measles and rubella vaccination team from Achlal Nalaikh Family Clinic greets a family near Ulan Bator, the capital. A UNICEF-supported maternity home provides services to nomadic women in Khövsgöl. A health worker feeds food sprinkled with micronutrient powder to a girl in Khövsgöl. A 4-year-old girl from a family of nomadic reindeer herders has her heartbeat checked at a Khövsgöl hospital. With UNICEF's support, Mongolia is demonstrating that all children can be vaccinated against measles and rubella.
  • The Mongolian government led the UNICEF-supported campaign, which vaccinated more than 500,000 children aged 3 to 14.
  • Mongolia's nomadic ways of life are changing. Ulan Bator, the capital, is home to almost half the population.
  • A girl winces while being vaccinated in an Ulan Bator school.
  • A child raises his small finger, which is marked to indicate he has just been vaccinated.
  • P. Oyunchimeg travels by reindeer to a remote area of Khövsgöl.
  • To reach this 4-year old girl, a team traveled by jeep, reindeer, rope-drawn ferry, and on foot.
  • A health worker prepares to administer the measles and rubella vaccine.
  • With UNICEF's support, Mongolia is demonstrating that all children can be vaccinated against measles and rubella.
  • Twenty-month-old M. Sarangoo smiles at her mother inside the local clinic in the northern Khövsgöl.
  • Twenty-month-old M. Sarangoo sits on the lap of her father in their home in Khövsgöl.
  • A measles and rubella vaccination team from Achlal Nalaikh Family Clinic greets a family near Ulan Bator, the capital.
  • A UNICEF-supported maternity home provides services to nomadic women in Khövsgöl.
  • A health worker feeds food sprinkled with micronutrient powder to a girl in Khövsgöl.
  • A 4-year-old girl from a family of nomadic reindeer herders has her heartbeat checked at a Khövsgöl hospital.
  • With UNICEF's support, Mongolia is demonstrating that all children can be vaccinated against measles and rubella.

All photos: © UNICEF/Brian Sokol

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